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joelbolt
10-09-2006, 02:29 PM
Chargers release Curry from practice squad

The San Diego Chargers released defensive back Markus Curry from the team’s practice squad today.

RAWDOGG
10-09-2006, 02:30 PM
HHHHMMMMM I wonder what that means?

ethan_ruddy
10-09-2006, 02:32 PM
I never even knew we had a player named Curry.

Tycebrew
10-09-2006, 02:35 PM
Chargers release Curry from practice squad

The San Diego Chargers released defensive back Markus Curry from the team’s practice squad today.


Any replacement yet?

LTfan4life
10-09-2006, 02:44 PM
HHHHMMMMM I wonder what that means?

It probably means there's someone they'd rather have on the PS...to be named soon.

getfresh
10-09-2006, 03:25 PM
Does this mean that Roman Oben is going to be activated after next week? Isn't the PUP list through week 6? Seems a little early, but that could be it.

SuperBowlBolts
10-09-2006, 03:27 PM
Does this mean that Roman Oben is going to be activated after next week? Isn't the PUP list through week 6? Seems a little early, but that could be it.
what does oben have to do with the PS? anyway man it's amazing how time flies when football season is going on and how long the weeks seem to drag on when its the offseason

chargerlew
10-09-2006, 03:46 PM
Curry was arrested on suspicion of domestic violence today.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20061009-1449-bn09curry.html

JerryinCA
10-09-2006, 03:51 PM
That article says it's not the first time he's been arrested for this and he pleaded guilty to an assault charge the first time. What's up with these guys?

goaztecs28
10-09-2006, 03:51 PM
Hmm..well he went to U of M, was a senior here when I was a freshman. He really wasn't that good to begin with, we aren't missing out on much.

JoeMcRugby
10-09-2006, 03:53 PM
That article says it's not the first time he's been arrested for this and he pleaded guilty to an assault charge the first time. What's up with these guys?

He had several incidents while at Michigan.

He was hanging onto a practice squad roster spot by a thread. No surprise after an arrest.

saintsfan_in_sd
10-09-2006, 04:42 PM
Full Article (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=nfl&id=2618842)

Chargers practice squad cornerback Markus Curry was released by the team Monday, just hours after he was arrested on suspicion of committing domestic violence. It was the fifth run-in with the law by a Chargers player since April, and the first time the team reacted by dropping the player.

adeepercut2k
10-09-2006, 04:46 PM
Notice to all Charger DBs: Stop. Just stop. Think. Contemplate. Act accordingly.

Time to clean house. Don't need this junk in the post-season.

gobolts_charger
10-09-2006, 05:37 PM
They released him...again?? He just got back on the PS.
Hmmmmm

cap808
10-09-2006, 05:39 PM
Hmmm... The last thing we need is another "Law Magnet"

StLBoltboy
10-09-2006, 07:30 PM
It probably means there's someone they'd rather have on the PS...to be named soon.

Or if Oben gets back on the roster from the PUP, Gregory would go back to PS.

getfresh
10-09-2006, 08:46 PM
what does oben have to do with the PS? anyway man it's amazing how time flies when football season is going on and how long the weeks seem to drag on when its the offseason

I meant clearing a PS spot for whoever is released to bring back Oben. It's all irrelevant, though; Curry blew what may be his one shot at fulfulling his dream.

LABoltsFan
10-09-2006, 08:54 PM
I thought that AJ and Shotty worked hard to find good characters.
another arrest... (even though its a practice squad guy)

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2618854

what is happening in the NFL?

are we recruiting NBA players?

conair103
10-09-2006, 08:55 PM
we released him today

as is says in the article haha

JoeMcRugby
10-09-2006, 08:56 PM
He's not a Charger any more.

Merging with the existing thread.

LABoltsFan
10-09-2006, 08:57 PM
SAN DIEGO -- Chargers practice squad cornerback Markus Curry (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?statsId=7658) was released by the team Monday, just hours after he was arrested on suspicion of committing domestic violence.
"It is disappointing. I think that goes without saying."
Chargers coach Mary Schottenheimer
It was the fifth run-in with the law by a Chargers player since April, and the first time the team reacted by dropping the player.
Curry was arrested following a traffic stop, according to San Diego Police Department spokeswoman Monica Munoz. He was booked into San Diego Central Jail on a count of inflicting bodily injury to a spousal cohabitant and held in lieu of $25,000 bail.
Curry was on the Chargers' opening day roster as a backup cornerback and played as a substitute in the first two games of the season. He was released on Sept. 30 to make room for safety Steve Gregory, but signed to the practice squad on Oct. 3.
Coach Marty Schottenheimer said he had no details but that word of the arrest was discouraging.
"It is disappointing. I think that goes without saying," Schottenheimer said.
General manager A.J. Smith didn't immediately return a call seeking comment.
While at Michigan in 2001, Curry was suspended after being charged with domestic violence. He was sentenced to one year probation. In 2002, he was one of two Wolverines players shot at a campus-area party.
Curry signed with the Chargers as a free agent in 2005.
Chargers outside linebacker Steve Foley (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?statsId=4483) was shot three times outside his suburban home on Sept. 3 by an off-duty Coronado police officer who suspected him of drunk driving. Foley is out for the season and will lose at least $775,000 in pay.
In April, Foley was arrested for scuffling with a San Diego police officer. Linebacker Shaun Phillips (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?statsId=6857) was arrested in a similar incident the same month. Neither was charged with any crime.
Starting strong safety Terrence Kiel (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/players/profile?statsId=6398) was arrested at team headquarters in September and charged with five felony counts of mailing codeine-based cough syrup to Texas. He has pleaded not guilty.
Kiel missed the Chargers' game at Baltimore on Oct. 1 but returned to practice last week and started Sunday night against the Pittsburgh Steelers (http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/clubhouse?team=pit).
from article on espn.com

.

LABoltsFan
10-09-2006, 09:05 PM
Is this normal for most NFL teams/

JoeMcRugby
10-09-2006, 09:10 PM
Is this normal for most NFL teams/

Pretty close to it.

I'd estimate that at least two to three NFL players get arrested per week - most in the DUI category, but domestic violence is another common arrest - unfortunately. :(

JoeMcRugby
10-09-2006, 09:27 PM
Here's a column from Hub Arkush, editor of Pro Football Weekly. It touches the tip of the iceberg as far as NFL player arrests go - and even sadder to say, the percentage of NFL players getting into trouble pales in comparison to NBA players:
________________________________________

Let’s call this column Part II after I wrote in this space last week about the completely unacceptable behavior of Odell Thurman, Terrence Kiel, Ricky Manning Jr., Sam Brandon, Terrell Owens, Jake Plummer and Jared Allen and my concern that it is becoming an epidemic rather than an exception.

Nothing has really changed with any of these young men other than the fact that all but Thurman were on NFL playing fields in Week Five, and it appears that none of them will suffer any serious consequences for their actions, and therefore, are unlikely to experience any real behavior modification. Since then, Tennessee’s Albert Haynesworth has taken a whack at beheading Dallas C Andre Gurode in Nashville, and a judge in Seattle has finally said enough is enough and sentenced WR Koren Robinson to serve some real time in jail for the risks he continues to take with other people’s lives by driving under the influence of alcohol.

In the case of Haynesworth, new NFL commissioner Roger Goodell acted swiftly and significantly, suspending the tackle for five games without pay, more than doubling the previous most significant punishment for unnecessary violence on the field. As to the debate whether or not the punishment fit the crime, I’ll leave that to greater minds. I applaud Goodell for doing what I believe was all that he could as quickly as he could.

I also believe that good enough or not, the NFL’s substance-abuse policy is the best of any professional sport and is at least making as significant an effort as possible to deal with an issue that is, in fact, a moral and societal problem and not a cause and effect of pro football.

But clearly, violence is a direct component of professional football, and while the league does have its hands tied to a degree, required as it is to let the courts set the boundaries by which it can respond, I still can’t escape the question of whether we are all being proactive enough trying to prevent most of this garbage before it happens.

I am particularly intrigued by the situations of Haynesworth and Manning. Haynesworth’s history could as easily have been written at Sing Sing. At the University of Tennessee, he had an altercation with a teammate, left the practice facility and returned with a pipe with the clear intention of causing mayhem. He also had a road-rage incident in which he attempted to run a woman in her car off the road. Several years ago, he had an altercation with teammate Jeff Hartwig during practice in which he kicked Hartwig in the chest harder than he kicked Gurode. Asked about the Gurode incident, Hartwig replied, “Nothing should surprise you from that guy.”

In 2002, Manning was placed on probation as a result of an assault charge. I’m not clear whether it was the result of a conviction or a plea bargain. I know somebody got hurt, and Manning was involved. Now he has pleaded no contest to another assault charge. In addition to a young man being badly beaten, the victim and witnesses claim there were horrific racial and religious slurs involved. Manning claims he’s innocent on all counts and just wanted to avoid trial. The facts suggest otherwise on the assault charge, and whether Manning is guilty of the verbal abuse or not, it came from him or his “crew,” and he clearly did nothing to stop it. Yet Manning walks away with probation again.

There is talk in Tennessee that Haynesworth may not be welcomed back after his suspension is completed. But a 6-6, 325-pound defensive tackle with All-Pro ability will be welcomed somewhere with open arms, with or without any real rehab or counseling, and trouble will follow.

In the case of Manning, how does a guy who’s already been granted probation once for assault get probation a second time and is allowed to claim he did nothing wrong while being cited as one of the Bears’ new heroes?

I acknowledge that I’m not sure what the commissioner or the league office can do to solve these problems that they’re not already doing. But I think we all know Haynesworth and Manning would be in jail right now, or at least awaiting some real sentencing rather than getting slapped on the wrist, if they weren’t pro football players. And I think we can all agree there are 32 owners who would figure out a way to win without these clowns if we would all refuse to buy a ticket or turn on a TV as long as these guys continue to get a pass.

Should we welcome back Kiel to the Chargers, Brandon and Plummer to the Broncos, Allen to the Chiefs, Owens to the Cowboys and Robinson to the Packers while we figure out new ways to give them passes on their anti-social behavior in the hopes they will find ways to win football games for our favorite clubs? Or is it time we stopped pointing fingers at the powers-that-be and turning our own blind eyes to the mayhem and social disease we’re supporting and scream as loudly as we can that enough is enough, and we’re not going to take it anymore? Lock your wallets in your pockets, and see if things start to change.

http://www.profootballweekly.com/PFW/Commentary/Columns/2006/harkush2114.htm

JudeAwakening
10-09-2006, 11:55 PM
It's a wonder how one can be so close to fulfilling an NFL dream but instead throws it away with thugish and heinous behavior.

Good for you, curry. Hope you can fall back on that U of Michigan degree.

Dj Chemical
10-10-2006, 12:14 AM
Not to be a dick. but compared to these marines i live around NFL players have nothing on them when it comes to domestic violence.

joelbolt
10-10-2006, 12:24 AM
It's a wonder how one can be so close to fulfilling an NFL dream but instead throws it away with thugish and heinous behavior.youth + alcohol = problems add money and it can be a dangerous combination

youth + alcohol + too much money = athlete problems

Clint Beastwood
10-10-2006, 02:22 AM
We're kinda thin and inexperienced in the secondary right now, (depth wise)...CB Hank Poteat was released by the patriots today. I think he would be a good fit as a fourth corner for our team. He has some experiance with punt and kick returns too. I say we sign this guy and move Gregory or Gordon back the PS.

Lyth
10-10-2006, 05:03 AM
Curry was arrested on suspicion of domestic violence today.

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metro/20061009-1449-bn09curry.html

There must be something in the water in SD.....

SteveC
10-10-2006, 06:00 AM
I wonder who they are making room for?

JoeMcRugby
10-10-2006, 12:28 PM
Don't forget: for every Marcus Curry (and the dozens of players arrested on every team every year), there are a dozen NFL players like this.

From Peter King's column today:
______________________________________

LIKES HIS FRIENDLY NFL NEIGHBOR. From Rand Park of St. Paul: "Last Saturday I was at my neighborhood market in St. Paul (locally owned chain, nothing fancy), and Vikings center Matt Birk was there with his family doing some grocery shopping.

"Pregnant wife, two adorable little girls (one with bright red hair). Matt was wearing flip-flops and shorts and just hanging out with his family. A few people noticed, but no one interrupted them. I think the manager may have shook his hand as he walked by.

"With all the T.O. press and all the other shenanigans of some players (including some of our Vikes), I am really glad to see guys like Birk in the league. Here's a Harvard grad, All-Pro, on the day before a division game, out with his family having a regular day. The guy has his priorities in order, for sure.

"Birk has also opened two restaurants here in town, called Matty B's, that are basically a couple of supper clubs, one in St. Paul and the other in Minneapolis. Local guy, local investments, and the kind of guy you are proud to have your kids look up to. He was even the 'principal of the day' for my kids' elementary school a few years ago.

"That's all. Just a plug for one of the good guys, Matt Birk."

Great letter. Thanks.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/writers/peter_king/10/10/mmqbte/1.html
_________________________________________

Let's not paint NFL players with a broad brush based on the acts of the small minority.

Bolts Super Fan
10-10-2006, 12:40 PM
Don't forget: for every Marcus Curry (and the dozens of players arrested on every team every year), there are a dozen NFL players like this.

From Peter King's column today:
______________________________________

LIKES HIS FRIENDLY NFL NEIGHBOR. From Rand Park of St. Paul: "Last Saturday I was at my neighborhood market in St. Paul (locally owned chain, nothing fancy), and Vikings center Matt Birk was there with his family doing some grocery shopping.

"Pregnant wife, two adorable little girls (one with bright red hair). Matt was wearing flip-flops and shorts and just hanging out with his family. A few people noticed, but no one interrupted them. I think the manager may have shook his hand as he walked by.

"With all the T.O. press and all the other shenanigans of some players (including some of our Vikes), I am really glad to see guys like Birk in the league. Here's a Harvard grad, All-Pro, on the day before a division game, out with his family having a regular day. The guy has his priorities in order, for sure.

"Birk has also opened two restaurants here in town, called Matty B's, that are basically a couple of supper clubs, one in St. Paul and the other in Minneapolis. Local guy, local investments, and the kind of guy you are proud to have your kids look up to. He was even the 'principal of the day' for my kids' elementary school a few years ago.

"That's all. Just a plug for one of the good guys, Matt Birk."

Great letter. Thanks.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2006/writers/peter_king/10/10/mmqbte/1.html
_________________________________________

Let's not paint NFL players with a broad brush based on the acts of the small minority.

I'm sure he's a great guy although it helps to live in a place like he does where there isn't much to do :D Try to live in San Diego and go grocery shopping with your wife and kids on Saturday. Now that's a very good guy! :D

JoeMcRugby
10-10-2006, 12:42 PM
I'm sure he's a great guy although it helps to live in a place like he does where there isn't much to do :D Try to live in San Diego and go grocery shopping with your wife and kids on Saturday. Now that's a very good guy! :D

Bet you that's what PR has done for the past few years. ;)

If he continues to play like Sunday night, that will prove to be more difficult. :D